Lakes, Waters, Tarns and Snowy Mountains #AdeoOnTheRoad

This weekend an unseasonal late winter snowfall tempted me and some of my mountain-mad mates to make the 5-hour journey from South Wales to the Lake District for a spot of ice climbing and winter walking.

Can you believe this was taken with an iphone?
Can you believe this was taken with an iphone?

The Lake District is undoubtedly my favourite spot in England. For starters, the scenery is incredible: from the tops of the majestic, craggy peaks you are treated to stunning views over the glacial ribbon lakes that give the region its name. The Lake District is also home to England’s highest peak: Scarfell Pike and is a popular destination for hiking, climbing, mountain biking and kayaking.

We drove up late on Friday night, arriving late at the four-bedroom cottage where 35 of us would be staying…what can I say, it seemed like a good idea at the time! That is until 35 people wanted to use the loo in the morning…

The next day dawned foggy and snowy. The mountaintops were covered in thick white clouds which didn’t look too fun but we were determined to a spend as much time outdoors as possible during our weekend away so we slogged up High Street, named after the Roman Road which once ran over its summit. We spent most of the day stuck in the clouds, which was a good excuse to treat ourselves to a pub dinner that evening!

The next day we were karmicly owed a good day and we were rewarded with possibly the best conditions I have ever had in the Lakes. The sky was clear and blue, the snow was crisp and the wind had dropped. Perfect. We returned to Glenridding, on the banks of Ullswater, to begin a hike up Helvellyn, the third highest point in

That's me with the red bag!
That’s me with the red bag!

the Lakes after the twin peaks of Scafell Pike and Sca Fell. We decided to approach the peak via a short but tricky scramble up Swirral edge which meant crampons on and ice axes out! After jogging down the mountain and just about catching our train on time, we eventually arrived home, tired, achy, soggy and happily planning our next trip!

 

Most of our guests and the several million other tourists who visit the Lakes annually don’t end up scrambling up mountains in the snow! For the less adventurous the Lake District still has plenty to offer: check out the adeo Travel destination pages for more ideas of what you can get up to on your holiday to the Lake District!

You can visit the Lake District with adeo travel by car, coach or train. Visit our website or drop us an email enquiry to find out more!

Top Ten Walks in Wales

If you’ve read any of my other blog posts you’ll know that I’m something of an outdoors enthusiast. So living in Wales is ideal for me – there’s so much to do, from climbing to surfing; coasteering to kayaking. And hiking – most definitely hiking!

 

Wales is a bit of a walker’s paradise with wild moorlands, rugged mountain peaks and scenic coastal trails. And hiking is definitely the best way to get off the beaten track and explore the hidden beauty of the Welsh countryside.

Here, in no particular order, are the top 10 walks to try on your holiday in Wales:

  1. St David’s Head, Pembrokeshire

I plan to spend our next Bank Holiday weekend, coming up in just a few weeks’ time, exploring this section of the Welsh Coast Path. This spectacular stretch of coastline boasts golden beaches, ragged sea cliffs and an abundance of wildlife including seals and puffins!Pembrokeshire - Tenby (2)

  1. The Happy Valley Trail, Llandudno

This path through Happy Valley is an adventurous trek which leads to the Great Orme summit, a massive chunk of limestone rising out of the sea. You can reach the summit by cable car or tram but how much more satisfying to join the famous Kashmir goats in a scramble to the top?

  1. Isle of Anglesey Coast, Anglesey

The beautiful Isle of Anglesey is a walker’s haven, criss-crossed with tranquil lanes and paths. The coastal path is not for the faint hearted, climbing 4,174 metres during its journey, but is undoubtedly the best way to experience the wild coastal beauty first hand.

  1. The Branwen Walk, Snowdonia

Snowdonia - Harlech CastleHarlech castle is so impressive that they wrote a song about it: ‘Men of Harlech’. This walk through Snowdonia National Park is steeped in history and legend, taking in the mighty medieval fortresses, the town of Harlech, beach and dunes as well.

  1. The Dylan Thomas Walk, Laugharne

Track a ‘heron priested shore’ en route around the estuary where you’ll find the boathouse where Wale’s most famous poet wrote. With luck you’ll avoid ‘the pale rain over the dwindling harbour’, as you explore the ruins of medieval Laugharne Castle.

  1. Mount Snowdon, Snowdonia

There are many paths up Wales’ highest peak including the Pig and Miner’s path which both turn into motorways on a sunny day. If you’re feeling lazy you could hop on the Snowdon Mountain Railway Line and stop for tea and cake at the summit café.

  1. Pen y Fan, Brecon Beacons
Queues to pose on the summit of Pen y Fan!
Queues to pose on the summit of Pen y Fan!

The name Pen-y-Fan roughly translates as Top Spot. The regulars call the four-mile circular walk from the Storey Arms Outdoor Centre to the top of the highest peak in the Brecon Beacons National Park ‘The Motorway’, but the spectacular views bring them back for more.

  1. The Taff Trail and Cardiff Bay, Cardiff

Arguably the most popular walk in South Wales, the Taff Trail follows the River Taff all the way from Brecon, through the Brecon Beacons National Park, down to the Bristol Channel at Cardiff Bay.

  1. Rhossili Bay and Worms Head, Gower Peninsula

So called because of the resemblance of the rocks to the head of a dragon, the Worms Head walk is spectacular but requires careful planning. It is only possible to cross the causeway to Worms Head for 2.5 hours between tides. Never be tempted to swim the causeway if you are cut off; many people have lost their lives in the attempt.

  1. Elidir Trail, Brecon BeaconsBrecon Beacons (4)

The entrance to a fairy kingdom is reputed to be somewhere along the Elidir Trail, a tranquil walk which meanders among cascading and gushing waterfalls in the heart of the Brecon Beacons National Park.

Want to experience some of these spectacular walks for yourself? Why not visit Wales with adeo travel! Explore North Wales with our Mountains and Medieval Fortresses tour or try our brand new Small Group tour: Castles, Coast and Celts