Castle Hotels “An authentic night with a difference”

Castle Hotels “An authentic night with a difference”

Celebrating something special? A wedding anniversary, honeymoon, birthday milestone, retirement, maybe celebrating your children passing their exams or just looking for a vacation with a difference? What ever your special moment, why not consider experiencing a night in a castle hotel in the UK, which could be the perfect way to mark the occasion!!

With the vast history the UK withholds, castles built in previous eras can be found sprinkled around the whole of the England, Scotland & Wales. Frozen in time, these castle hotels stand regal, often set within beautiful gardens engulfed in breath taking surroundings. Even in this day they have the most original features still intact, as you enter you feel like your back in time…hidden in the walls of legends passed this creates a truly fascinating & authentic experience!

Here at adeo Travel, we pride ourselves on presenting our guests with the most charming and original accommodation possible, and believe that a castle hotel stay can really enhance a guest experience in Britain!!

Below are some of the great Castle stays we offer here at adeo Travel, take a look at our Castle & Manors of Britain, and Castles & Manors of England/Scotland & Wales tours on the self-drive tours section of our website to find out more and submit your request now to receive your very own, tailored itinerary, customised to your needs!!

Dalhousie Castle, near Edinburgh

Dalhousie Castle is situated in the parish of Cockpen, which can be found about eight miles south of Edinburgh. Dating all the way back to the 13th century, it still demonstrates many original features with, and even the ancient vaults remain today.

Most of the present structure was built around 1450 from the red stone quarried from the opposite bank of the South Esk River, on which the Castle stands.

Renovated into a castle hotel, it now has 29 individually and charming bedrooms, all themed around famous historical figures. You will find the decoration is faithful to Scottish design fabrics such as tweed, tartan and twill. Hard not to be enchanted with the details you’d expect from a building of this age you’ll enjoy its period features including furniture, rugs and carpets which harmoniously work together to create a warm, relaxing and fabulous overnight stay.

 

Sherbrooke Castle, near Glasgow

Sherbrooke Castle, became a hotel in just before World War two. It was originally built as a home or villa for its contracter John Morrison in 1986, a respected contractor of the time, built a baronial villa for himself in Pollokshields, namely, Sherbrooke Castle, designed by Thomson and Sandilands.

 

It is a good example of the type of house built by the middle class in the rather decadent late Victorian period and has a number of unusual features. The rooms are arranged around three sides of a large hall and staircase. The external Baronialism is, in some ways, an added romantic touch.

The hotel has luxury bedrooms and suites, a lounge bar & great restaurant

At the Sherbrooke, they have combined traditional grace with modern efficiency. Prestige with convenience that is enjoyed by many a guest.

 

Augill Castle, Cumbria

Augill Castle, was originally built in 1841 as a Victorian gentleman’s country residence, has all the fairytale romance of a turreted hideaway. Augill Castle is not just a hotel, but a country house in its truest sense.

Set in the Upper Eden Valley, it stands in open country and has had little changes for centuries. Set in the dramatic back drop of the North Pennines, you will find luscious gardens opening out to views of the nearby Yorkshire Dales and the Lakeland Fells beyond.

This is a great family run hotel with a rich history and a great experience for any visitors.

 

Ruthin Castle, North Wales

Ruthin Castle, was created by Dafydd, brother of Prince Llewelyn ap Gruffydd, for King Edward I of England in 1277 who gave the fort (that was present on the site) to him in return for his treacherous help during the invasion of North Wales that year. Dafydd also had castles at Caergwle and Denbigh.

It was originally known by the Welsh name of Castell Coch yn yr Gwernfor or The Red Castle in the Great Marsh.

In the early 1960’s The Castle was purchased at auction and converted into an hotel. One of its most notable guests since was HRH Prince Charles who stayed on his way to his investiture as Prince of Wales (the 21st Prince of Wales since the new title began in 1301).

Now, Ruthin Castle is a beautiful retreat; interesting in its history and nestled in acres of parkland beside the Clwydian Range in North Wales. Here you can indulge yourself with exquisite dining,& unwind in their distinctive spa. Enjoy the renowned Medieval Feasts and luxurious accommodation!

 

Thornbury Castle, near Bath & the Cotswolds

Edward Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, built the castle during the reign of Henry VIII, though he wasn’t able to enjoy it for long. After being betrayed to the king by a disgruntled servant, Stafford was arrested for high treason and executed on Tower Hill. Henry claimed the castle for himself, spending ten days here while on his honeymoon tour with Anne Boleyn. It remained royal property until the death of his daughter Mary I, when it was returned to the Duke’s descendants.

For two centuries, the castle was unoccupied, falling into ruin. In the 1850s, it was saved and turned into a family home. Its more recent occupants have included the Howards, the Clifford family, Kenneth Bell MBE and the Baron and Baroness of Portlethen

Today, visitors can enjoy Thornbury Castle at its best. Tudor style meets modern excellence, with comfortable four-poster beds, magnificent open fireplaces, a dungeon dining room and a grand hall for balls, feasts and parties.

 

 

So, why not take a step back in time, treat yourselves like the Royals, and enjoy an evening to remember with a night in a castle hotel! You can find these fantastic examples aswell as many more in our self-drive section of our website under Castle & Manors of all Britain, Scotland,England & Wales . Request your own personalised tailor-made self drive tour today with adeo Travel, your Britain Vacation Experts.

 

Driving in Britain Tips

One of the more frequently raised topics regarding our self-drive tours here at adeo Travel are concerns about driving in Britain, namely about operating a vehicle on the left-hand side of the road during your time here.
This blog should help quash some of your fears about driving in our country and make you feel a little bit more relaxed before your Britain vacatioCar on country roadn.

When you enquire for a self-drive tour here at adeo Travel, as standard we will include a rental car with an automatic transmission. Although the majority of cars here in Britain are of manual transmission, we feel that having an automatic car will give our guests a smoother transition into driving in Britain.

Although we give you directions to each of your hotels in your travel documents that you will receive prior to travel, you may still wish to consider including a GPS navigation system with your car rental. If you have a GPS system instruct you on where you are going, this will allow your focus to be on getting used to the differences in our road systems – you also have less chance of getting lost which is always a bonus!

Driving on the other side of the road to what you are used to may seem fairly daunting at first, but feedback from our past guests tell us that it is easier to get used to than you would think! The fact that the driver’s seat is on the opposite side of what your brain is used to will straight away make you aware that something is different, which makes it much easier to adapt. If you do wish to go exploring the backroads here in Britain, our country roads can often be as narrow as a single-lane anyway, so there really is no need to fret!

Another key difference of British roads are roundabouts (or traffic circles). Roundabouts may appear daunting on paper, but as long as you remember to get into the correct lane for the direction you are heading and give way to the right then you will have nothing to worry about.

There is no ‘right on red’ equivalent here in Britain. Instead, we have filtered traffic lights. Do not proceed forward unless the light is green and there is no traffic or the designated filter is green for the direction you wish to go.

This blog has covered some of our frequently asked questions about driving in Britain – if you have any further questions then please do not hesitate to contact us and we will be more than happy to assist.

A variety of our self-drive tours can be found on our website, each quote will have car hire included as standard. We look forward to hearing from you!

When Should I Travel in Britain?

Here at adeo Travel, we are always here to help if you have any queries before, during or after travel. One of the most frequently asked questions that we receive is to do with when to travel in Britain. This blog should help answer some of the questions you might have.

If you are a fan of hot weather, our temperatures reach their peak in July & August so consider enquiring for these months if you want to attempt to catch a tan while on your travels (the heat here may not be as intense as where you are from!).
Certain events such as the Edinburgh Tattoo only occur in August so if you are interested in being immersed in Scottish culture then this month is definitely for you.

For those of you that wish to avoid the crowd, perhaps consider travelling in May or June. In these months we still have pleasant weather, but sights and attractions will be less busy due to schools still being in session. There is also likely to be enhanced availability for accommodations and tours during these months which may benefit you.

If weather isn’t a concern to you, why not consider travelling in winter? Travel in December will see you be able to visit the famous markets of Bath and York. There is also the potential of snow which will get you right into the mood for Christmas.

If you are after an authentic experience in England, Scotland or Wales, you could consider aligning your travel dates with the days of the patron saints. For travellers in England, St George’s Day is April 23rd, St Andrews Day in Scotland is November 30th and St David of Wales’ day is March 1st.

Another important thing to bear in mind when enquiring for your Britain vacation is that we have a set of Bank Holidays throughout the calendar year. On these days, most attractions will be closed and demand will be fairly high due to most of the population being off school and work. Below are the scheduled Bank Holidays for 2017 in Britain:

Monday 2nd January – New Year’s Day (substitute day)
Friday 14th April – Good Friday
Monday 17th April – Easter Monday
Monday 1st May – May Day
Monday 29th May – Spring Bank Holiday
Monday 28th August – Summer Bank Holiday
Monday 25th December – Christmas Day
Tuesday 26th December – Boxing Day

Hopefully this information has helped you in deciding which dates you would like to visit our country. Enquire today and we will happily send you a no obligation tailored quotation – we look forward to hearing from you!

Highlights of Britain Small-Group Tour – My Experience

As you may have seen from my last blog, recently I had the opportunity to go on one of our more popular group tours the ‘Highlights of Britain’.

Oxford UniversityWe had an early start from the centre of London, where everyone met in a timely fashion. Once the luggage was loaded onto the mini-coach, we headed straight for Oxford.
It was here that we had our own personal walking tour of the city by a local resident who was very knowledgeable of all the sites and answered all questions our group had with accuracy.
It was especially great to learn about the history of the famous Oxford University while inside the buildings themselves and having plenty of picture opportunities.
After the walking tour, we were allowed two hours to ourselves to explore the city privately. There was an opportunity to get food before exploring landmarks such as Blackwell’s Bookshop, which stocks over 200,000 books and its Norrington Room is the largest single room devoted to the selling of books in Europe at 10,000 square feet.
Departing Oxford, we headed to the Cotswolds where we got to see Bampton, famously used as a fictional village in Downtown Abbey.
Our stay for the evening was in the lovely Three Ways House hotel, where we treated to a three-course meal before becoming dessert connoisseurs by taking part in their famous ‘Pudding Club’.

Leaving the Cotswolds on day two, we headed north to Worcester Cathedral; it was here that we had a tour by a knowledgeable and charismatic historian. The Cathedral houses the tomb of the infamous King John and there were plenty of photo opportunities in this stunning builIronbridgeding.
After the tour concluded, we headed to Much Wenlock where we had an hour to get food and explore the quaint and picturesque village.
After our stomachs were satisfied, it was back on the mini-coach and up to the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Ironbridge which was a stunning sight. The bridge was the very first bridge in the world made with an arch-shape out of cast iron. Again, picture opportunities were in abundance and I am still using the photo I took of Ironbridge as the wallpaper on my phone to this day!
After a long day of sightseeing, we crossed the border into North Wales where we retired for the evening.

After a lovely breakfast on day three, we departed our hotel and headed for the Area of Outstanding National Beauty known as Snowdonia Park, home of the impressive Mount Snowdon. The weather was good to us on the day that we visited; the lakes a beautiful blue and the valleys gorgeous green in colour.
Departing Snowdon, it was up to the island of Anglesey where we crossed the Menai Suspension Bridge to visit the famous village of Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch and of course we all took turns trying to pronounce it!Snowdonia
Coming back to mainland Wales across the Britannia Bridge, we visited Bodnant Welsh Food Centre where we had a lovely three course meal followed by a Welsh cookery lesson and a tour of the centre itself.
It was then that we headed back to our hotel after a thoroughly enjoyable day of sightseeing in North Wales.

At the beginning day four, it was time for me personally to leave the tour and return home, but the tour itself lasts nine days and continues through Britain where the rest of the group got to see places like Chester, York, The Lake District and Scotland, concluding in Edinburgh.

With the dates for 2017 recently released for the Highlights of Britain tour, what better time is there for you to enquire to book with us today – I couldn’t recommend this tour enough!