Roman baths, historic hotels and a very British pub #AdeoOnTheRoad

A bright and crisp February morning was the perfect opportunity to get out of the office and pop over the Severn Bridge to explore Bath and Somerset. I was excited to get back into my home country of England to see the sights.

The Art Bar at the Abbey Hotel in Bath
The Art Bar at the Abbey Hotel in Bath

Our first stop was the quirky Abbey Hotel in Bath. This characterful hotel is right in the Centre of Bath, just a couple of minutes’ walk away from the train station. The owners, Ian and Christa Taylor, are art enthusiasts and the public rooms feature a range of unique pieces of artwork ranging from gigantic, vibrant oil paintings and distinctive installations, to a magnificent, abstract glass chandelier in the bathroom. I love art and the quirky style of the hotel was right up my street so this is definitely somewhere I would stay.

The only other time I’d been to Bath was an incredibly wet and miserable day a few years ago, guiding a school group. Back then a soak in the Roman Baths might have been in order to relieve the stress of keeping 40 13-year-olds under control! Since it was a completely grown-up trip this time though we had some time to enjoy a wander through Bath’s cute little alleyways filled with independent boutiques, traditional sweetshops and ‘ye olde’ tea rooms. It would be easy to fill a day just strolling round this quintessentially English city, walking in the footsteps of Jane Austen and taking in the distinctive Georgian architecture; for more ideas of what to do in Bath check out our website here.

The Limpley Stoke Hotel
The Limpley Stoke Hotel

A ten-minute drive out of the city took us through the picturesque Somerset countryside to the tranquil village of Limpley Stoke to visit another hotel: The Limpley Stoke Hotel. The Limpley Stoke is a Best Western but don’t let that fool you. As well as boasting spectacular views over the Somerset hills, this 18th Century country house is full of character and the location in the quaint village of Limpley Stoke gives you a real feel for the traditional English countryside. Inside, visitors will love the enormous lounge area and the traditional bar with access onto a lovely terrace; the perfect place to enjoy a drink and enjoy the scenery on a warm summer’s evening.

We finished off our morning with another quintessentially English experience – lunch at Wetherspoons*! After all, you just can’t beat an all-day breakfast!

Patriotic Wetherspoons pub
Patriotic Wetherspoons pub

If you fancy a visit to Bath you can explore on your own with our Cotswolds and Historic cities self drive tour or join one of our many coach and small group tours such as the Elegance of Great Britain tour and the Heart of England Or simply contact us direct and we’ll put together a bespoke holiday just for you!

*You may not know what a ‘Wetherspoons’ is now but after a couple of days in Britain you’ll realise they’re an unavoidable feature of British life! It is rare to find a town in Britain that doesn’t boast a Wetherspoons pub famous for traditional pub grub, cheap booze and hideous carpets

Join adeo Travel for a year of travel in Britain – #AdeoOnTheRoad

As you probably know, here at adeo Travel we are destination specialists – based here in Britain, we provide holidays to the country we know and love, our home! In fact, we offer a commitment to our guests to know England, Scotland and Wales inside-out and have a unique, first-hand experience of the great British vacations that we offer.

Car on country road
Car on country road

Now, as locals, we like to think we already know a thing or two about travel in Britain, but as perfectionists, we know that there is always more to learn! For this reason, in 2016 we have decided to put our money where our mouth is and spend even more of our time out on the roads of England, Scotland and Wales; from the bright lights of London to the wilderness of the Scottish Highlands. Throughout the year we will be partaking in familiarisation trips, seeing the sights, inspecting hotels, meeting with vendors, attending travel trade events, perfecting itineraries, sampling tours and just generally honouring our commitment to you. After all, the more we know our stuff, the better we can ensure you have the very best experience when you come here to the UK on your travels.

Traditional English Inn
Traditional English Inn

So why not come with us as we travel the length of breadth of Britain!? All you need to do is “like” us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter and keep an eye on this blog and we’ll keep you fully up to date with our adventures; bringing you trip reviews, anecdotes, commentary and photos from our travels. We’ll be offering both inspiration and practical help for your own trip here in Britain!

And, of course, we want you to get involved online yourself! No campaign is complete nowadays without a hashtag, so keep an eye out for #AdeoOnTheRoad on our social media pages and you too can follow, comment and share your Britain travel tips and experiences with us and our community of guests past, present and future in preparation for your own vacation.

Here’s to a year of travel in Britain and the beginning of your own adeo Travel Britain trip!

Glasgow Amongst Top Twenty Destinations Worldwide for 2016

Think of world-class visitor destinations in Scotland and you may think of the wilderness of the Scottish Highlands, the Isle of Skye, Loch Ness and the wonderful city of Edinburgh; well now you should think of Glasgow too as the city was last month named among National Geographic’s top twenty worldwide destinations to visit in 2016!

George Square, Glasgow
George Square, Glasgow

As regular visitors to Glasgow, here at adeo Travel we need no convincing of the unique attraction that the city holds for tourists. However, due to its close proximity to the internationally renowned destination of Edinburgh (around an hour by car), it’s little wonder that Glasgow has, in the past, been slightly overshadowed.  Following its selection by such a highly-regarded international travel magazine for its prestigious destinations list, Glasgow might now receive the recognition it deserves.

Kelvingrove Gallery, Glasgow
Kelvingrove Gallery, Glasgow

Glasgow has recently seen a steady rise in profile having played host to a number of prestigious sporting events including the Common Wealth Games in 2014 and several tennis ties this year which saw Britain progress to win the Davis Cup Trophy for the first time in almost 80 years.  However, it is primarily for its music and arts scenes that Glasgow has found recognition by National Geographic – last year the city hosted the MTV Music Awards and renowned stars including Beyonce and One Direction have performed at the SSE Hydro venue in the heart of the city; events which reinforce Glasgow’s status as a UNESCO world city of music (one of just nine across the globe).  And, already home to cutting-edge exhibitions and galleries at the Kelvingrove Museum and the Burrell Collection, amongst others, Glasgow’s art scene is only set to grow as it welcomes the Turner Prize to the Tramway arts venue in early 2016.

River Clyde, Glasgow
River Clyde, Glasgow

Music and arts however are just the tip of the iceberg of what Glasgow has to offer its visitors; the city boasts a number of historic attractions including the gothic 12th century St Mungos Cathedral, some of the finest Georgian architecture in Britain and sites on the banks of the Clyde related to the city’s shipbuilding industry.  Glasgow was recently voted the friendliest city in the UK, the Merchant City area is renowned for its quality restaurants and there are two distilleries in or just outside the city if a dram of Scotland’s “Water of Life” is your tipple.  And whilst Glasgow is Scotland’s largest city in terms of population, the great outdoors is still right on your doorstep with the bonny banks of Loch Lomond and the stunning landscapes of the Trossachs National Park just a short drive from the city centre.

So, with a long-established and diverse appeal alongside this more recent and well-deserved recognition, why not make Glasgow just one of many highlights on your 2016 trip to Scotland.

Visit Glasgow by car, rail or coach on one of our recommended itineraries:
Scotland Explorer Tour
Explore Scotland by Rail
Best of Scotland
Scottish Dream

When in England, do as the Romans do…!? Our Top Five Roman Sites of England.

Late last year during the building of a new hotel in the heart of the city of London, workmen discovered the statue of an eagle clutching a writhing snake.  So well preserved, it was unimaginable that the statue could have been of Roman origin however specialists later confirmed that it did indeed date back to the 1st or 2nd century AD when the World’s greatest Empire had spread throughout England.  Today, the statue is on full display to the public in the Museum of London but if you want to get more in touch with Roman Britain why not walk in the footsteps of the Roman people themselves and visit some of the country’s most stunning excavated Roman sites.

Below is adeo Travel’s countdown of our Top Five Roman sites of England:

5. Roman York

Minories Roman Eagle Statue - Museum of London
Minories Roman Eagle Statue – Museum of London

The Romans had an excellent eye for identifying strategic locations for their settlements and this was never truer than when they inhabited what was previously an unsettled area in Yorkshire, but which would soon become the undisputed capital of the North of England.  The city of York was born in AD71 when the Romans pushed their empire North from Lincoln and gave them a strategic base at the point where the River Fosse meets the River Ouse and from whence they could continue to push north.  Today the Yorkshire Museum in York houses some of Britain’s most impressive Roman artefacts including mosaics, sculptures and tombstones whilst existing Roman remains can be spotted in situ at Multangular Tower and in excavations in the under croft beneath the magnificent York Minster itself.

4. Roman Amphitheatre in Chester

Roman Amphitheatre dig in Chester
Roman Amphitheatre dig in Chester

Chester, or Castra Devana as it was known by the Romans, was once England‘s largest Roman settlements covering some 60 acres.  It is thought the site was used for legionary training and as a strategic naval base on the River Dee as far back as 75AD.  With parts of the area having been carefully excavated since the 1960s it was not until 2004/2005 that archaeological investigations uncovered (literally) parts of England’s largest Roman amphitheatre which at its peak could have seated 7000 spectators and included a shrine to the Goddess Nemesis.

3. Cirencester, Capital of the Cotswolds

Roman Mozaic Corinium Museum, Cirencester, Cotswolds
Roman Mozaic Corinium Museum, Cirencester, Cotswolds

As a result of Roman settlement, the charming town of Cirencester became capital of the region which would later become known as the Cotswolds located in the heart of England.  Constructed in the 2nd Century AD, the Roman amphitheatre in the town would once have seated more than 8000 people; today it remains largely unexcavated but offers excellent walks for views of the town. In the heart of Cirencester however you’ll find its true gem at the Corinium Museum, a treasure-trove of local Roman heritage which houses arguably the best collection of Roman artefacts outside of London.  Also well-worth a visit are the nearby excavations of the Chedworth Roman Villa.

2. Roman Baths in Bath

Roman Baths in Bath City
Roman Baths in Bath City

Possibly England’s most visually spectacular Roman remain, the Roman Baths in the city of Bath were constructed as far back as the 1st century AD.  After discovery of hot water springs from the nearby Mendip Hills, with magnificently advanced engineering the Romans constructed their Temple of Sulis Minerva which was soon regarded as one of the best bathing stations throughout the entire Roman Empire and drew visitors from across Europe, even in those times!  Since its rediscovery in the 18th century, when workmen uncovered the bronze head of the goddess Minerva, the magnificent temple has been fully excavated and restored and today you can walk the worn slabs that the Romans themselves strolled along and even sample the mineral-rich water which drew them here in the first place all those centuries ago.

1. Hadrian’ Wall

Hadrian's Wall, North of England
Hadrian’s Wall, North of England

Undoubtedly one of the greatest achievements of the Roman Empire in Britain, Hadrian’s Wall stretches from coast to coast across the North of England for almost 80 miles.  Constructed by Emperor Hadrian as a barrier to keep out the “uncivilised” Scottish Pictish people the wall was an early form of border control with deep ditches, tangled undergrowth and frequent forts and watch-towers defending the wall itself which in places reached 15 feet tall.  Long stretches of the wall remain in-tact today and provide excellent hiking routes whilst the Roman heritage comes to life at excavations and the best of the remaining wall-forts including those at Housesteads Fort, Chesters Fort and Birdoswald Fort not to mention at the Roman Army and Vindolanda Museums at Hexham.

For more information on experiencing first-hand any of the above locations as part of your tailor-made tour of England, simply ask your adeo Travel Britain vacation expert.

Pride and no Prejudice! Jane Austen to appear on new ten pound note.

It was confirmed last week that Jane Austen will be the controversial new face of the British ten pound note when it is launched in 2017.  Why controversial you may ask – Austen seems a natural choice as one of England‘s most renowned authors whose works are enjoyed to this day and whose stories have been reworked for the television and movie screens time and again.  Indeed, she would seem to sit well in the long line of famous British historical figures to appear on our currency from William Shakespeare right through to Scottish inventor James Watt and nature scientist Charles Darwin.

How the new Jane Austen ten pound note may look.
How the new Jane Austen ten pound note may look.

However, the announcement takes on new significance when you consider that Austen will be only the third female ever, apart from her Majesty the Queen herself, to appear on a banknote of Great Britain.  And that the only other woman – prison-reformer Elizabeth Fry – to currently appear on our banknotes is due to be replaced in 2016, by a male figure (Winston Churchill).

It was this announcement of Fry’s replacement earlier this year which caused a storm of debate – an online petition demanding more female representation on our nation’s cash, aside from the Queen, gained 35000 signatures and there were even threats of court action against the Bank of England on grounds of equality and discrimination.  Austen had been suggested as a potential female figure and a social-media campaign of support was quickly galvanised.

Bath Abbey, Bath, England
Bath Abbey in Bath where Austen lived for much of her life.

Fortunately, last week’s confirmation that Jane Austen will indeed appear on our new ten pound notes has quelled some of the controversy.  The new Governor of the Bank of England seems to be more than happy with the selection saying that Jane Austen clearly “merits” a place amongst the other historical figures and that her novels are both “enduring” and with “universal appeal”.  And in response to the online petition he has also announced a review of the selection process for who appears on our bank notes to ensure improved diversity in the historical figures portrayed.

So soon it will be with great pride that we see Jane Austen represented on our banknotes and hopefully we won’t see this type of prejudice again!

Interested in Jane Austen, why not visit the Jane Austen centre in Bath or the museum set in her former home at Chawton near Winchester.